It is currently Fri Jul 21, 2017 4:38 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:18 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 9:21 pm
George A. Romero


Top
 Profile  
 

 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:23 pm 
Dot Com Dom
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm
Quote:
Romero died while listening to the score of one his favorite films, 1952’s “The Quiet Man,” with his wife, Suzanne Desrocher Romero, and daughter, Tina Romero, at his side, the family said.

I love this. RIP Romero


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:34 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2008 5:09 pm
Location: Edinburgh, UK
Gutted. Maybe Criterion can include some tributes on their Night BD if it's coming from them.

RIP Sir.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:37 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 08, 2016 12:54 pm
Location: Great Falls, Montana
Poetic. Here's to a life well lived and a great filmography. My heart sank when I read the news.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:42 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 09, 2013 6:24 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM
I just rewatched NotLD a few weeks ago with a friend who had never seen it and isn't a big fan of horror movies, and he came away impressed enough to be interested in seeing the sequels. A big loss.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:42 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 12, 2010 6:10 pm
Ah man. This one really hurts. I'm also furious that Richard Rubinstein is sitting on Romero's two best films, Dawn of the Dead and Martin.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:54 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 4:30 pm
Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK
Very sad news but I am extremely glad that he got to return to make another Dead trilogy in the 2000s with Land, Diary and Survival, all of which are as radically different from each other in tone and content as the original three films were. Not to mention in Land of the Dead giving Dennis Hopper one of his best late roles (and John Leguizamo for that matter).

The original Dead films are masterpieces, great fusings of social satire and pure entertainment with a very bleak edge. And of course Martin is also a similar masterpiece of ambiguity, vampire modernisation (with that amazing clash of this classical monster against modern settings,decor and equipment) and someone wishing to be something not being quite the same as actually being it (at least until your wider community starts validating your 'lifestyle choice'!). John Amplas is perfect in that title role and its a shame he didn't get a bigger career from it (though he's also excellent in a small support role in Day of the Dead). Then of course there's the fantastic Knightriders, which is kind of about the same reality/fantasy divide and the resilience it takes to 'live your dreams'!

The very underrated Season of the Witch (which yes does have the famous Donovan theme tune!) is the female-centred version of that same theme, especially of the fusing of repressed sexuality and horrific liberation. Its like a serious version of the recent The Love Witch!

I'm slightly less taken with the rough and ready 1973 The Crazies (but it does have fantastic, tragic performances by Lynn Lowry and Richard France in supporting roles meeting ironic fates, and some really strange editing transitions set to a military drum beat, which provides its own damning commentary on who really caused the outbreak!), but it now seems like a 25 year early premonition of all the "its not shambling zombies but fast moving 'infected' monsters" films like 28 Days Later and the Dawn of the Dead remake!

In some ways Romero's biggest theme was perhaps people trying to come to terms with the strange alienating world of the late 20th century, ignoring the wider troubles that they can't do anything about to create their own insular worlds with strange, almost incongruous, preoccupations (that lyrical consumerist paradise interlude in Dawn of the Dead, where the zombies almost get forgotten about is perhaps the supreme example of that). But no matter how much they try to block it out, those worlds are always flimsily built on sand and inevitably get overwhelmed by the bigger issues in the end.


Last edited by colinr0380 on Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:23 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Passages
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:00 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Fri Sep 14, 2007 2:30 am
Location: Philadelphia via Chicago
Makes wanna watch The Quiet Man again.

We lost a great one... I thought I read somewhere he was working on another one. Sad.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:52 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 4:30 pm
Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK
Speaking about consumerism, here's a collection of Romero's earliest commercials, including a fun take on Fantastic Voyage to advertise washing powder!

And here's a 1997 BBC TV interview with Romero that marked the UK TV premiere of Dawn of the Dead.


Last edited by colinr0380 on Sun Jul 16, 2017 7:12 pm, edited 3 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:58 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 04, 2004 8:31 am
I'm sure I'm far from alone in stating this, but when I first seriously got into film as a teenager, horror, suspense, and thrillers were where it was at for me. Hitchcock, Cronenberg, and Romero were probably the first filmmakers I recognized as "auteurs" in the classic sense. Romero made a lot of very good films, but Night, Dawn, and Martin alone will forever make him one of the greats for me.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 7:40 pm 
Not PETA approved
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:02 pm
Location: Canada
Damn. Night has been my favourite horror film ever since I saw it as a terrified 10-year-old. I still attribute my occasional zombie nightmare to the influence it had over me. It was a flattening experience for a kid whose horror diet was exclusively Universal and early Hammer films by that point. I didn't see the sequels until the end of high school, but I enjoyed them immensely. Was not expecting this news at all.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 8:08 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jul 15, 2013 8:28 pm
Location: Greenwich Village
What a shame. And the timing sucks. It would have been such a joy for him to see the Criterion and Arrow releases get devoured by his fans. RIP.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 11:24 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2005 4:22 am
Location: NYC
From an appreciation from his adopted hometown of Pittsburgh:

His Image Ten film company was started with a friend after graduation from Carnegie Mellon University. They used money from making short films for the PBS children’s TV series Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood to buy a camera for a project originally titled Night of the Flesh Eaters.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 2:04 am 
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2004 3:38 am
Sucks.

Hopefully he comes back and kicks off the real thing.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:03 am 
User avatar

Joined: Fri May 16, 2008 4:43 pm
That post is pretty morbii, but if “the real thing” were ever to occur, medical science be damned, I can’t think of a more appropriate scenario.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:31 am 
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 4:30 pm
Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK
Its hard to understate the influence that turning zombies from their voodoo origins into flesh-eating reanimated dead bodies had on the horror genre, cinema and particularly video games (where zombies are always a good option for human-looking antagonists who can be killed without the moral element of guilt. See the way that the Call of Duty games, with their politically iffy campaigns, often have an additional zombie mode added in! Its also because at this current stage of development of video game A.I. it is easier to create mindless 'horde' waves of enemies to fight than those who can react to the player's actions more believably. The explanation? They're zombies!), but also on pop culture in general. We'd not have a lot of other films, books, games and TV series without Romero's original trilogy.

And I also think that Night, Dawn and Day are the perfect examples of 'making a statement about issues' without being too obvious about it. The underlying themes are impossible to miss (especially in Night, where its all about relationships of all forms being 'betrayed', or at least being powerless in the situation), but I love that having a black man in the lead role in Night and at least co-lead in Dawn and Day doesn't have to be underlined any more than that. Having a woman as a co-lead in Night and Dawn, and lead in Day, doesn't need any more 'motivation' added to it. Just being present in those roles is its own powerful statement, so for example we don't need Harry and his family in the basement to be an enormous bunch of racists to underline their differences (as they were in the unfortunately too literal in all areas 1990 remake), just have Harry be an angry grump, worried that Ben is going to get them all killed! Which is understandable in the circumstances!

It makes the original trilogy seem more powerful in that it goes beyond racial and gender issues (though of course they're in the mix) and more into treating black people (and women) in the lead roles of a film as their own characters, rather than having to represent just their race or gender. Why can't Barbara be catatonic throughout Night? I would be too in the face of something like that!

(Its perhaps similar to the way that Alien later on made its own commentary about having a female lead without a big thing needing to being made about it in the film itself. It leaves room for the audience to note and celebrate the presence of a woman in that kind of role if they wish to, or even not notice it at all!)


Last edited by colinr0380 on Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:38 am, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:33 am 
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2004 3:38 am
mfunk9786 wrote:
That post is pretty morbii, but if “the real thing” were ever to occur, medical science be damned, I can’t think of a more appropriate scenario.


Exactly! And I meant it with utmost respect.

:D


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 5:51 am 
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 4:30 pm
Location: Chapel-en-le-Frith, Derbyshire, UK
I still love that moment from Day of the Dead:
Quote:
Sarah: Maybe if we tried working together we could ease some of the tensions. We're all pulling in different directions.

John: That's the trouble with the world, Sarah darling. People got different ideas concerning what they want out of life.

Here's the shorter version of the Roy Frumkes documentary filmed during the making of Dawn of the Dead, Document of the Dead


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:32 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 04, 2004 8:22 am
Location: The Room
I love every Romero film I've seen, but Dawn of the Dead is the real stand out for me. An absolutely perfect film, balancing lightness and darkness, comedy, drama and horror brilliantly and never taking a wrong step. I'm always in awe of it every time I watch it (a Halloween tradition, obviously). It may be the most perfect film I've seen and it's been my favorite film for years.

Very sad to see Mr. Romero go. I'm sure he had plenty of great movies left in his head, just waiting to get out.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group




This site is not affiliated with The Criterion Collection